For information about how to add something to the Worlhord collection, see the Add to collection section. For other questions, try our Frequently Asked Questions section.

Help - how to search the collection

The interface for Woruldhord is designed to be as simple as possible. Simply insert the term you are interested in into the search box on the start page and you will be presented with a range of results. It is suggested that you keep the terms as simple as possible (e.g. 'Wulfstan' NOT 'Archbishop Wulfstan of York'). Your search term will look across all the fields for each object.

The results will then be presented to you with some basic information - 'Preview' (an icon giving a bit more information about the result), the "Title", and the "Contributor". If you click on the title or icon you will then be taken to more information about the resource. At the bottom, in the box entitled 'Attachments' you will then be able to 'Download'.

You can also browse the collection by key terms which we have preselected. These relate to major topics, events, characters, and also by date.

Each object will have some basic information about it (if known):

  • Title: A title that describes the object (e.g. 'Ruthwell Cross', 'Handout on Beowulf', etc)
  • Description: More information about the submission.
  • Creator: Person(s) who created the digital resource (e.g. 'Dr J Bloggs' or 'The Museum of Poppleton').
  • Date: Date when the digital resource was created (e.g. 2006).
  • Audience: If it is an educational resource we will try to indicate the intended audience.
  • Language: The main language that is needed to understand the resource (Modern English is the default), e.g. Old English, Old Norse, etc.
  • Date of original item: If known (e.g. '1066', '7th century' etc).
  • Location of original item: If the exact location is known this may have been indicated by text, or in many cases through geolinking to take you directly to Google Maps.

In nearly all cases you will be presented with a file to download (e.g. an image, a document, etc). In some cases the submission may have been several files which have been zipped together (.zip). This is particularly common with large manuscript collections, or web sites.

Any further questions?

For information about how to add something to the Worlhord collection, see the Add to collection section. For other questions, try our Frequently Asked Questions section. If you have any further questions or want to become even more involved in Project Woruldhord, then you are welcome to contact us.

University of Oxford