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DRHA 2008: Digital Resources in the Humanities and Arts 2008: New Communities of Knowledge and Practice

Complete List Of Submissions


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Christopher Engdahl

(Submission #1)


Summary

A performance-piece questioning the authorship and/or authority of the choreographer and exploring new ways of collaborating within the context of dance and choreography by using communication technologies. A project developed in collaboration with an MA-student at the science department at dance-institute Laban in London.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
intellectual property rights

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

OF SCHOLARLY WRITING AND CREATIVE WRITING

Dibakar Pal

(Submission #2)


Summary

INTRODUCTION

As you know well that Francis Bacon(1561-1626), the immortal essayist, wrote many essays viz., Of Love, Of Friendship, Of Ambition, etc. The genius rightly pointed out that all the words of the dictionary can be the themes of essays one can write. But little has been done, in this regard, since his death to finish his unfinished monumental works. In fact Bacon's way of representation i.e., his rare individual style kindled the imagination already in me and encouraged me as well to write. I am a Civil Servant in India, yet I write essays, in the light of creative writing, to get relief through Catharsis.

OF SCHOLARLY WRITING AND CREATIVE WRITING

Who is a scholar? A widely read person is a scholar. But a creative writer

(creator hereinafter) may not have such extensive study. Even without so-

called formal education, an individual may be a creator. A scholar makes

brilliant result in the examination. In other words, score is the yardstick of a

scholar. The more marks, the more scholar an individual is. On the other

hand, a creator, generally, cannot make good result and even sometimes

fails to qualify in the examination. Perhaps, failure renders an individual to be

a creative writer. Thus, disqualification is his qualification.

A scholar has thirst for knowledge. But a creator feels to create something

new. Both of them try to increase knowledge. A scholar continues his study

to widen the horizon of knowledge. He can do anything to acquire

knowledge. For that reason he can undertake painstaking endeavor to realize

his ambition. A creator also starts his study like a scholar. But in the mid-way

creativity disturbs his attention towards studies and leads him to do

something new thus rendering him a diverted genius. And finally a creator

fails in the examination due to lack of preparation. But a scholar makes

brilliant result and paves his way towards temporal gain. However, both the

scholar and the creator start with studies but the former finishes it while the

latter leaves it. Thus a scholar works hard, but a creator hardly works hard.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

IS RETIRED LIFE A RETARDED LIFE ?

Dibakar Pal

(Submission #3)


Summary

Retirement means, service of the concerned incumbent is no longer required due to

Inefficiency caused by old age. They say, scrap that old machine and purchase a new

one .Thus retirement implies opportunity to the fresh blood. An old man is complex-

minded. Various experience, good or evil, convert a simple man to a complex one. So a

complex character may take judicious decision. But he is not suitable for implementation.

For implementation fresh blood is preferred. This is why the proverb goes as – old

is gold but young is bold. Old is just like the last rays of the setting sun having inner

significance.

Retired life means relief from normal routine life. After retirement man is guided by non-

routine life. Here man plans for relaxation. And his activity is free from cares and

anxieties. Someone likes to remain, ‘far from the madding crowd’. So they retire from the

world. Somebody retires into himself and plans for devotion to God. Again someone

plans to finish the long-cherished but unfinished works which are of two types viz.,

classical and commercial in nature. Further classical works can be categorized into two

different classes viz., personal and non-personal or social. Thus retired life can be spent

in different ways as per taste and temperament i.e. attitude of an individual concerned

towards life. Some people use it aimlessly. An aimless man, in fact, does not know how

to enjoy life. So he becomes tired very soon. But a judicious man can enjoy life to the

lees.

Some retired people consider retirement as an unemployment again. He was once

unemployed at his youth. This is his second unemployment at old age. Since he

understands that he will be no more, he tries to do something being driven by strong

emotion thus to make himself glorious after his death. But he is too late. Romans are

famous for Rome. But Rome was not built in a day. So glorification cannot be achieved

overnight. It needs life-long endeavor. Life means a short journey. It is not the

Marathon race. So there is little scope to compensate deficiency. That is why we see a

few successful individuals in the battle field of life.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

DOES JACK MASTERLY SPEAK ?

Dibakar Pal

(Submission #4)


Summary

An empty vessel sounds much. Jack sounds much, since Jack is empty. Jack wants to

speak whatever he thinks. He wants to communicate whatever he sees. Jack always wants to

remain empty. He has a ‘vomiting’ character. He absorbs nothing. He is an extrovert. Thus, he

vomits everything. So he has no disease. As such, Jack is immortal. So, Jacks are found in all

ages. Thus, their very existence is observed through generations.

On the other hand, John sees everything, hears much, bears more than that, but speaks

nothing. He is an introvert. They say he has a reserve personality. Perhaps this is the cause of

his premature death. John is vigilant. He looks before he leaps. But Jack leaps everywhere. He

leaps first without any fear or hesitation where John does not. So he falls down and breaks his

crown. Jack is restless. He pays no attention to a thing for a long period of time, for he has

commitment elsewhere. In short, Jack is a first-class fool having ‘zero’ sense of hard reality. He

seldom considers the fact that money and fame are the first and foremost crying needs of a

successful individual for long-cherished recognition.

Jack has subjects but John has object. For, the fact is that John has definite object. He

takes appropriate measure to realize his ambition. As a consequence, he achieves his desired

goal at ease and becomes successful in every sphere of life. His life is pre-calculated. As such he

faces no problem from cradle to grave. His life is a life of no problem. So they humorously

remark that John has no problem and that itself is his problem.

Conversely, Jack is interested in all the numerous subjects of the whole universe. He has

a classical belief that all subjects belong to knowledge which is being ceaselessly emitted from a

single source. So he loiters in every field, viz., grass-field, paddy-field, ‘Sheffield’, etc., and tries to

be a ‘Nesfield’ in vain. He fails successfully and his successful failure chases him from one field

to another to welcome success.

Jack nurtures an optimistic philosophy in his mind. He argues whenever an individual

tries for something, there are two possibilities. Either he may fail or he may fail to fail. An

individual should simply try for the latter one. Experienced John always fails to fail. But innocent

Jack is so unfortunate that he always fails. Seldom he fails to fail. So, misfortune dogs Jack

wherever he goes. Yet he is an optimist. It seems he is an autonomous body who is again a self-

encouraging personality as well.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Uncovering Understanding: lifelong learners’ experiences of e-moderation in the second year of the diploma in European Art History, Adult Continuing Education, University College Cork, Ireland.

James Gerard Raphael Cronin

(Submission #5)


Summary

Lee S. Shulman, examining signature pedagogies in the professions, predicted the centrality of web technologies in shaping future curriculum design (Schulman, 2005).

Studies in the application of learning technologies in higher education are generally focused on the 18-30 age group. The reception and use of information technology by lifelong learners still needs to be articulated within a constructivist paradigm. To what extent does embedding hypermedia, in general, and a moderated discussion forum, in particular, enhance a lifelong learner's participation and disciplinary understanding? How do these embedded elements affect curriculum design as Schulman predicted?

This paper considers Schulman’s deep structure paradigm as a departure point. It applies and evaluates Salmon’s Five Stage Model of e-moderation (Salmon, 2002) for moderating an online discussion forum to uncover understanding in year two of the diploma in European Art History, Adult Continuing Education, University College Cork, Ireland.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

‘Black Japan in the Butoh dance‘

Dr Rodreguez King-Dorset

(Submission #6)


Summary

I would like to present a Paper and screen a forthcoming short dance film installation. This project will involve a Black Anglo filmmaker (myself) and a Butoh dance therapist Toshiharu Kasai, who is a university Professor in Japan and a Japanese dance artist, ‘Black Japan in the Butoh dance‘, will address two interrelated questions: 1) In what ways does the current state of research in performance practice of Black art in England challenge the existing paradigms of Japanese Butoh. 2) How relevant is "Japanese By Spring," the recently re-published novel by the black academic Ishmael Reed, to 21 century Anglo-Japanese multiculturalism mind/body perspective. Context: The historical and intellectual context of this project is provided by Ishmael Reed’s ‘Thinking Japanese’ He suggests that multiculturalism is positive, but ethnic ghettoisation disastrous. This is the ethnic diversity that stems from the British ideal of the melting pot, involving varying ethnic groups to harmonise to build a stronger and better Britain of the future. It is an argument at odds with the far right which argues that we are too different to get along and should simply re-segregate. This process has been a matter of debate and activity at the political and economical levels, but its dance cultural and intellectual aspects are as yet under-explored. Those academic fields which might have been expected to make these interventions have yet to do so.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Installation

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.


Determining Value for Digital Humanities Tools

Susan Schreibman and Ann Hanlon

(Submission #7)


Summary

Tool development in the Digital Humanities has been the subject of numerous articles and conference presentations. While the purpose and direction of tools and tool development for the Digital Humanities has been discussed and debated in those forums, the value of tool development itself has seen little discussion. This is in part because tools are developed to aid and abet scholarship – they are not necessarily considered scholarship themselves. That perception may be changing, though.

The goal of this paper is to demonstrate how the process of software or tool development itself can be considered the scholarly activity, and not solely a means to an end, i.e. a feature or interface for a content-based digital archive or repository. This paper will also deal with notions of value: both within the development community and as developers perceive how their home institutions and the community for which the software was developed value their work.

The data for this paper will be drawn from two sources. The first source is a survey carried out by the authors in 2007 on The Versioning Machine, and a second survey currently being analysed focusing on tool development as a scholarly activity.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
policies and strategies for digital deployment
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Bioart: Transgenic art, recombinant theatre, butterflies, FISH and functional portraits

Susan Broadhurst

(Submission #8)


Summary

Bioart centres on the artistic investigation of biotechnology and raises complex ethical issues, such as, those relating to the patenting and sale of genes. At the same time genetic engineering is transforming forever our notions of and relationships to life forms including our own. Moreover, the discipline of biological studies is increasingly changing from a life science into an information science. For instance, ‘biosemiotics’ is an interdisciplinary science that studies communication and signification in living systems. Contemporary artists have responded to these changes by working with transgenics, cloning, reproductive technologies, tissue culture engineering and hybridization techniques that reconfigure the borders of artwork and life.

For instance, Eduardo Kac concentrates on exploring the ‘fluidity of subject positions in the post-digital age’, by means of a combination of ‘robotics and networking’, ‘telepresence’, ‘biotelematics’ and ‘transgenics’ (Kac 2005) and Critical Art Ensemble (C.A.E.) are bioartists, who through their ‘recombinant theatre’, have made technology, wetware, and transgenics, the focus of their work. Another artist who works with biotechnology is Marta de Menezes who has for her project Nature? (1999) reprogrammed patterns on butterfly wings by injecting the pupa in development. In her work Functional Portraits (2002), she utilizes Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize in real time the operation of the brain.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

The Poetics of Challenge - Developing Artistic Works in an Emerging Digital Tool Set

Elizabeth Miklavcic and Jimmy Miklavcic

(Submission #9)


Summary

The Access Grid® video conference communications software is an advancing set of elements combined into an amazing and powerful tool kit that can be employed to create distributed performances that involve a variety of sites throughout the world. This exciting, emergent and creative vehicle can bring about a host of fascinating challenges. Ironically, the first among them and the most important is communication. Sharing and coordinating ideas among a group of local collaborators is difficult enough. Distribute the same collaborators across the globe and again share and coordinate ideas through a 320 by 240 pixel portal and the difficulty is compounded.

The development of the InterPlay performance series began in 1999 and was built upon the Access Grid infrastructure. It was followed by an emerging first public performance in 2003 and continues to date. It has created many unique challenges and at present, the challenges have matured and multiplied with each subsequent performance. This developmental process, the issues surmounted and those currently being addressed are discussed in this paper.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
policies and strategies for digital deployment

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

Open Challenge: On-line Environments for Design

Artemis Yagou

(Submission #10)


Summary

This paper explores the challenges and opportunities to the design community by the new technologies of communication and networking. Internet-based tools contribute to a new understanding of design by providing novel platforms for communication, co-creation and dissemination. Design is thus increasingly regarded as an interdisciplinary, collaborative activity, established on a collective process of creation. The obsession with objects and with the lone designer-hero is replaced with an enthusiasm for the process and the dynamics of social interaction. The paper discusses in particular Open Source, a collective, collaborative, evolutionary process of creation, which has been successfully applied in software development and has been infiltrating the wider design community for several years. A number of existing applications of the Open Source paradigm in design contexts are described to illustrate the range and diversity of challenges and opportunities posed by new technologies to communities of knowledge and practice. The implications are far reaching and should be further explored in all aspects of design practice, education and research.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Nerve Scales

Barry Edwards

(Submission #11)


Summary

Nerve Scales is a performance for two actors and a digital technology artist exploring the collaboration of voice, text, image and sound. Underpinning the performance is the integration of live capture and processing of sound and image with the delivery of action and text. The use of live capture with movement is widely practiced, its application with textual delivery less so. In this performance the text is adapted from Antonin Artaud’s document Nerve Scales. In it he uses words to interrogate the origin and efficacy of language. The performance is able to explore these deeply psychological and metaphysical issues using a combination of acting and digital technology in a way which does not reduce the paradoxical nature of the writing.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Search me: issues in the design of online historical research resources

Stephen Brown

(Submission #12)


Summary

There is a growing level of expectation as to the availability of research resource materials in digital form. Yet there remain issues about the ICT skill levels of Arts and Humanities researchers and the nature of some data in this field that create particular design challenges. In principle, skillful, informed pre-structuring of data makes it easier for researchers to retrieve and interact with relevant information. Yet pre-structured knowledge is not always greatly appreciated by Arts and Humanities scholars and limited skills can help to limit the effectiveness of such resources. This paper addresses information design challenges within the context of an AHRC Resource Enhancement project 'Photographs Exhibited at the Royal Photographic Society 1870-1915'. The project encountered three major issues likely to be of interest to other online historical resource developers: data complexity, ambiguity and weak ties. This paper describes these issues in greater detail, how they were identified and tackled using user-centred design principles and how they were addressed through the use of alternative search entry forms, tools for refining search results and inclusion of original source material to complement structured database information.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Poster

Keywords

digitisation techniques and problems
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
cataloguing and metadata aspects of resource discovery

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Stretching Boundaries: Nuclear Physics & Fine Arts

Nicole Jacquard

(Submission #13)


Summary

In 2005 Dr. Sokol, the former director of IUCF, and I wrote a proposal for a collaboration of the Nuclear Physics and Fine Arts departments. For a year and a half I utilized IUCF’s facilities and technical expertise culminating in a body of art work. Within the work, Personal Objects : Personal Spaces, I have researched the use of Computer-Aided Design, Computer-Aided Machining, and Rapid Prototyping and Machining (CAD/CAM and RP&M).

In 2008 I was the recipient of a Fellowship from the Institute of Digital Arts and Humanities. During my Fellowship I will continue to research and develop my work utilizing the ABS Plastic RP machine in Sculpture, the CNC router and 3-D color printer at the IUCF, the Haptics Technology at the Advanced Visualization Lab, and the Reverse Engineering 3-D Scanner at the Department of Kinesiology. It is then my overall intension to continue to apply my research to the classroom at IU as well as teach an intensive workshop on Rhino at RMIT University in Australia. At the end of the workshop I will invite 6 RMIT students for a year overseas exchange in order to use IU’s facilities to create work in a collaborative environment.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
digitisation techniques and problems
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

a(t)tribute

Lynn Charlotte Lu

(Submission #14)


Summary

A(t)tribute is a durational performance designed for a single participant at a time, for a context in which most of the participants would be strangers or acquaintances who do not know each other well. I will wait for visitors in a room, which will be empty save for two chairs, two blank notebooks, and writing pens. Entering the room, the visitor will be invited to sit and be given written directions for participating in the piece:

Please write a description of who / what you think I am. What do you imagine my likes, dislikes, life, temperament, concerns, desires, interests, etc., are? And I will write a description of who / what I think you are.

Scrutinizing one another, the visitor and I formulate a candid description of who or what we imagine the other person to be, based on what we see and sense. What we observe about a stranger is also coloured by our own projections based on the associations they evoke.

At the end of the day, all the descriptions written by the (anonymous) participants, as well as the ones by me, will be taped up on the walls of the room to be viewed by all.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

interactivity and performance

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

When Geeks Go Camping: cyberspace and the outdoor life

Sue Thomas

(Submission #15)


Summary

This paper examines the evolution of nature metaphors in computing and cyberspace via some examples of the influence of Californian outdoor life on computer culture in Silicon Valley and beyond. It is drawn from research for a book-length study, The Wild Surmise: Nature and Cyberspace http://thewildsurmise.com which discusses the many ways in which we use our experiences of nature to situate and comprehend our experiences of cyberspace. It examines the hypothesis that cyberspace contains not only the cities and suburbs of cyberpunk but also the great outdoors, from rural landscapes to wildest nature. The project will be extensively developed in relation to California culture and landscapes during a 2009 Visiting Scholarship to the University of California, Santa Barbara, funded by The British Academy.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

The mememe in collaboration

Tine Bech, Dave Lawrence, Sam Woolf and David Theriault

(Submission #16)


Summary

Mememe (as in ‘me me me – choose me!’) combines sculpture and sound with a Real Time Locating Systems (RTLS) to promote the emergence of interesting sonic structures. The installation is centred on Ubisense technology together with Max programming, and involves the tracking of specially designed shoes worn by the audience in the exhibition space to trigger/create an interactive soundscape.

Core to the project is collaboration. The research is linked to Tine Bech’s ongoing exploration of the membrane between the body and the world, and the interest of each of the collaborating artists in using tactile materials, interactive technology and sound. Tine has collaborated with Sam Woolf on several previous installations. Since meeting with Dave Lawrence, at the 6000 Chairs festival exhibition in Crystal Palace Park (2004), they have collaborated. The artists worked with the Cambridge based company Ubisense, who specialise in RTLS systems and who supported the project technically. Ubisense technology is leading edge technology, and only a small number of artists are as yet actively utilising its capabilities.

The project has previously received funding from The University for the Creative Arts at Farnham, Middlesex University and The Digital Arts Festival in Denmark.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Installation

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

A Punch in the Gut: Empathy and Meaning in Performance Art

Lynn Charlotte Lu

(Submission #17)


Summary

This paper will examine a genre of performance art, which operates in the ambiguous, fluid space between life and art, making its meaning understood not only cerebrally but also viscerally. Certain artworks go beyond tickling our brain to leaving us feeling, quite literally, like we've been punched in the gut.

To understand why, I will investigate the phenomenon of innate human empathy and its role in ensuring resonant and vicarious bonds even between strangers. Since empathy, as discussed in this paper, is possible only the 'empathizer' has had first-hand acquaintance with the 'empathizee's' situation, I will take an epistemological look at the modes by which we acquire knowledge, with a particular focus on experiential knowledge.

I will trace the lineage of art/life melding in the West and East (Japan in particular) from the Futurists to the present, and examine a range of 'gutty' contemporary performances.

This paper will attempt to show that 'gutty' performances – through their reliance upon empathy to affect us intellectually, emotionally, and even physiologically – have the unique ability to remind us of our inherent interconnectedness with other sentient creatures. By bringing awareness to our shared embodied condition, such works nurture our relation to one another.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

interactivity and performance

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Cytoplasmic Manifesto: Performing alternative discourses of Science

Rachel Armstrong

(Submission #18)


Summary

The Cytoplasmic Manifesto is a contemporary, socialist, feminist argument that proposes a new view of human identity argued from a molecular perspective. Although it is consistent with scientific observations, the Cytoplasmic Manifesto offers an alternative viewpoint that challenges science’s allegedly rationalist examination of our identity and in doing so exposes its weaknesses through humanities and arts practice offering the possibility of alternative cross disciplinary dialogues.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Panel Session

Keywords

exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
interactivity and performance
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Sandboc, Interdiscplinary research and development in art and design

simon robertshaw

(Submission #19)


Summary

Sandbox, is a unique initiative that brings together a wide range of skills and expertise to allow the generation of new and collaborative forms of working. Its creative workspace, facilities and staff enhance the capabilities of cross disciplinary forms of development and production across academia and industry.

In its simplest form Sandbox is a physical and staff research development Centre that enables and provides support for interdisciplinary activity that has Digital at its core. The research is user-centred rather than solely reflective.

Fundamental to the vision is that we work with the research community, industry and new start up opportunities. The Sandbox builds connections across Faculties at UCLan to enhance research opportunities, new developments and activities to achieve an effective true interdisciplinary centre that is a catalyst in generating new ideas, projects, and products and exploiting those new opportunities.

The Sandbox itself will be a Centre that will provide two key elements;

Firstly a unique combination of interdisciplinary practitioners that develops new digital interactive service innovations in collaboration with and influencing industry, culture and communities. This group will be made up of staff that are capable of delivering real value in research and production and will come from academia, industry, residencies and staff from UCLan that have been allocated time to work within the Centre.

Second by providing an innovation environment that will allow companies, Faculties, Departments, cultural organisations to engage, debate, and find solutions through a unique combination of interdisciplinary activity, creative technological toolkits and expert facilitation.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
interactivity and performance
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
intellectual property rights


Virtual Environments for Research in Archaeology (VERA): Use and Usability of Integrated Virtual Environments in Archaeological Research.

Melissa Terras, Claire Warwick, Claire Fisher, Mark Baker, Amanda Clarke, Michael Fulford, Mat Grove, Emma O’Riordan and Mike Rains

(Submission #20)


Summary

This paper presents the results of a study by the VERA project (Virtual Environments for Research in Archaeology) which investigated how archaeologists approach and use advanced virtual research environments to access post-field excavation data. At the research excavation of the Roman town of Silchester, an advanced online database system for managing recording, analysis, archiving and online publication of archaeological finds, contexts and plans has been developed. Data entered into the system provides a rich, detailed information source for post-excavation archaeological research. However, little is known about how such virtual research environments are used, or how their usability can be improved, to facilitate access to archaeological information.

This paper details our findings about how archaeologists utilise such rich information environments to undertake new research, and the type of benefits and problems which arise from adopting virtual research environments in archaeology. Through a combination of user workshops, interviews, and case studies, we investigated how both new and experienced users approach the virtual research environment, and how we can improve the usability of such systems to facilitate their relevance, usefulness, and uptake.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
digital media in time and space
policies and strategies for digital deployment
digitisation techniques and problems
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

cipo_07 (cybernetic intelligent parasitic object) audio-visual robotic performance - interactive installation

KOSTAS DAFLOS

(Submission #21)


Summary

The CIPO program refers to installations of ‘open’ actions, which are based on time and reinforce the spectators’ active contribution and vital energy of their body presence. Active spectators are taking part in this work, contributing as (co-)composers in environments of preconditioned/ set up installations, producing open outcomes from direct body actions and personal performances.

CIPO_07 installation is based on the articulation of archaic, contemporary and hyper-modern: -systems of representation, - devices, -instruments, for the production of hybrid technological handmade post-objects. It incorporates the new media with the older and the body presence, towards an extensive ubiquitous hybrid technology, causing new experiences of space. The conjunction of creative with inventive activity free from the formal demands of the cultural market and the socialization of technologies, handle ‘’strange’’ practices, extending the aesthetic and technological rules in unforeseen ways. The empiricist tests with technologies and media lead towards a contemporary experimental art (inhabiting forsaken prototypes and unprofitable production.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Installation

Keywords

interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

Slaughterhouse Five -- Digital Performance

Fahrudin Salihbegovic, Tatjana Ljujic and Aleksandar Djeric

(Submission #22)


Summary

As a part of the last year Open Arc Theatre Festival, SET produced the digital performance 'Slaughterhouse Five' – an adaptation of the legendary Kurt Voneggut's anti-war novel. While the performance was thematically engaged with the issues of war traumas and reconciliation in the region's post-war countries, its other important function was to raise awareness of the new aesthetic possibilities which lie in the use of the latest digital technologies in theatre. The performance had an immediate success in Serbia (Belgrade premiere will be in September 08 at Bitef Theatre) and has been invited to several theatre festivals.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

SL'ÉTUDE: Performative Presence Rendered Across Worlds

Franziska Schroeder, Pedro Rebelo, Chris Chong and Alain Renaud

(Submission #23)


Summary

This proposal consists of a talk on networked performance environments, followed by a performance involving the virtual environment SecondLife.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

A relay of joy Synaesthesia and drawing: a performance of a physical computing assembly

Tim Long

(Submission #24)


Summary

A relay of joy is a physical computing device for playing sounds in response to marks placed on a sheet of paper. The user is hooded, so the sound relays the location of the mark, assisting coordination. The intention is to draw a face, which emerges in response to sound rather than sight. The implications of this device are strange to me, I cannot work out what is happening. Using the machine, the user is locked into a cybernetic assembly, or an abstract machine. I have borrowed this term from Deleuze and Guattari's book, 'A Thousand Plateaus', which has helped to underpin my practical research as an artist, and my PhD research on the grotesque image and imagination. The abstract machine comprises further abstractions of the body as a fragmented form. The machine deals with the abstractions of sound, stripping out sight in an attempt to locate a face that’s going to emerge from touch. The sense impressions are perverted: it’s a deliberate ill effect that turns the machine, as the crisis turns in the subject. I would like to install and perform the machine during the conference and discuss work with another conference entrant, my colleague, Bryan Hawkins.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

Creativity, Technology and the Liminal Spaces of Education Exhuming the Un-dead – The Theories and Practices of Creativity in Visual Educational Contexts

Bryan Hawkins

(Submission #25)


Summary

The research is drawn from a HEFCE funded Research Informed Teaching initiative, which has enabled staff at Canterbury Christ Church University to test out methods for embedding research into teaching, and to demonstrate the open-ended and experimental qualities of creative visual arts practice, as a model for learning.

Theories of creativity inform creative practice in the visual arts, creative practice also influences and constructs our understandings of creativity. Despite postmodernity the author, the artist and creativity are not fully dead, neither, however, are they alive as they were. Creativity is in limbo – it is in an un-dead zombiesque condition - it is sliding, unwholesomely, homelessly, between different contested sites and forms. In visual education contexts these important elements of the dynamic relationship between the theory and practice of creativity are often excluded from the content of teaching and learning. The research has attempted to develop strategies for implanting these issues within the core of student’s experience of visual creativity.

The conclusions of this paper move towards the potential for opening new spaces for dialogue and new forms of dialogue between staff and students in relation to the theory and practice of creativity and the value of new technologies and the digital.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

The Multikultur@ Language Academy www.multikultura.co.uk

Annemarie Künzl-Snodgrass, Hugo Azérad and Silke Mentchen

(Submission #26)


Summary

The real need for British students to master more than one language must be met by developing new ways of teaching innovative material which could run parallel to what is done in schools, thus relieving some of the pressure put on teachers and making learners more independent and tuned into themes which straddle GCSE, AS and University levels. The Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages (Cambridge) wanted to make a contribution to promoting language study in schools nationwide and developing further skills in learners. It was awarded a grant from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) to develop a ‘Modern Foreign Languages Aspiration Project’, called Multikultur@ Language Academy.

Multikultur@ offers a range of language-learning material in the form of three virtual Academies for French, German and Spanish that allow the learner to become immersed in the relevant language and culture. Special care has been taken to select themes that are exciting, non-stereotypical and relevant to young learners. Subject areas such as Art & Culture, Geography, Society, History, are covered using different learning resources: reading texts, audio files, grammar notes and exercises. Each Theme has a set of accompanying ‘Teachers’ Follow-up Notes’.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Installation

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

University of St Andrews Image Database Project

Birgit Plietzsch

(Submission #27)


Summary

The paper discusses one recent electronic resource creation project within the University of St Andrews that benefits all academic Schools within the Faculty of Arts. This is the St Andrews image database. The project came into being as a result of collaboration of a number of academics from different subject areas with technical experts.

It is suggested that in our digital world cultural change is needed on two levels: the Arts and Humanities and on the level of institutional ICT support provision for these subjects.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
policies and strategies for digital deployment
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
cataloguing and metadata aspects of resource discovery

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Digital Interfaces in Dance Performance Environments

Sita Popat, Helen Bailey, Scott Palmer, Simon Buckingham-Shum and Martin Turner

(Submission #28)


Summary

This panel will discuss visual communication interfaces in dance performance environments through the frames of three current/recent research projects: e-Dance, Projecting Performance, and StereoBodies/Morphologies. These projects use digital technologies to facilitate non-co-located performances, either between dancers at different sites or between on-stage dancers and off-stage operators. The three projects offer intersecting yet distinct perspectives on this process. The panel will question how such interfaces are experienced by the performers, how they can be approached as choreographic environments, and how they affect the process of viewing. In an art form that prioritises physicality and embodied knowledge, how do dancers negotiate their performances with remote partners via digital interfaces? How might such interfaces redefine choreographic understandings of embodied spatio-temporal relationships? How might spectators comprehend and appreciate performances that exist in their entirety only at the boundary of the digital interface?

Categories

Proposal Type:  Panel Session

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Invisible.

Anna Piva and Edward George

(Submission #29)


Summary

Invisible is a multi disciplinary sound/art-science-education project on dark energy and the invisible universe, the creative imagination, sonic culture, and sound art performance.

Invisible explores -

- the openings for digital art and sound art performance suggested by cosmology’s confirmation of the existence of an enigmatic, expansive anti gravitational force which dominates the universe, via the language - of dark energy - used by cosmologists to describe this enigma.

- the connections between this new cosmological insight and sound based cosmologies whose work and thought precedes modern cosmologists attempts at making sense of the way this invisible force works.

- the correspondences between childhood and cosmological imagination, between childhood perceptions of darkness and invisibility, and cosmological thought about the workings of this invisible force.

The artists and Dr. Carolin Crawford, observational astronomer at Cambridge Institute of Astronomy, will give a presentation describing the project's themes and the nature of its collaborative processes.

The artists, joined by a quartet of jazz and Indian classical musicians, will also give a performance of improvised music using sonified data evidence confirming the existence of dark energy, all of which will be subjected to a live dub mix, with visuals by generative designer Adrian Ward.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

the hit

fabienne audeoud

(Submission #30)


Summary

“The hit” is an art performance around the notion of the audience as form. The proposal is to present a lecture about the piece and a music performance accompanying it

-When one speaks about classical music, one refers to a certain period in time.

-The term jazz refers to the form of music -even if it has precise historical references. It’s about a specific way of composing and playing music.

-Pop music refers to popularity, which is not about notes and rhythms but the audience. Pop music is named after its reception and not after its form. The so-called popular audience as a group defined by its size and its capacity to receive and adopt a specific product. The so-called capitalist system sells numbers to numbers: you don’t only “consume” or listen to music, but a taste that has found a justification in an audience. The audience buys itself.

« The Hit » is like Adorno describes art, an unresolved contradiction. and it deals with music as content as well as the social reality of how music becomes the audience refers to what Deleuze and Guattari call transversal connections.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

interactivity and performance
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

"Where's Aldo?" Documentalism 2.0: Second Life Avatars, Documentation Strategies and the Vision of Suzanne Briet

Dennis Moser

(Submission #31)


Summary

This paper examines possible tools for providing documentation in virtual environments, focusing on Second Life and the real world artists and performer who appear there. It will do this, in part, by presenting a test case of a real life musician and sound artist, documenting his activities and interactions with other artists in that environment. It seeks to expand the principles of documentation as espoused by Suzanne Briet's "Qu'est-ce que la documentation?"("What is Documentation?) and to advocate the use of Second Life tools to document the Second Life cultural heritage materials being created. As evidenced by reputable press accounts, these materials are beginning to assume substantial significance in both the Second Life environment and real world as holding substantial real value, both cultural and financial. The paper further considers the application of these same tools to non-cultural heritage aspects of these environments, as well, as an increasing number of educationals, corporate and "official" governmental entities become increasingly involved in day to day activities there and are mandated to adhere to standards of records security and records management. The future impact of all of these behaviors for research is also considered.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
digitisation techniques and problems
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

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[Proposal (RTF)]  

Hidden Psychological Mechanisms of Socialism on the Web

judson wright

(Submission #32)


Summary

There are two distinct perspectives about the role of computers. One camp sees a conduit, a tool to mediate between human minds. An author writes, a reader reads what is written. The computer passes messages between them. Mediation is thereby extended to “new media”, and thus the role of images (still or moving) and sounds (spoken or musical) are viewed as such meaning conduits.

In the other camp, the computer is a fancy calculator for solving Boolean logic in the form of code. However, not everyone has a need to create cloud simulations. For those of us who are not interested in what computers (alone) can do, we don’t actually need them. We were conned out of a significant investment of money and time. Our psyches make it nearly impossible to justify this. (So we remain in the first camp.)

An exchange may seem segmented. Rather, the author doesn’t have message, but a syllogism, an open-ended question. The audience isn’t listening for messages, just as we don’t (usually) try to comprehend the pattern of leaves on a tree to appreciate them. Un-intuitively, these two interactions are not related. Herein lies the root of misunderstanding about digital technology in art

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
digitisation techniques and problems
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
cataloguing and metadata aspects of resource discovery
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
intellectual property rights

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

An Approach to Cross-Age and Cross-Cultural Information Access for Digital Humanities

Akira Maeda

(Submission #33)


Summary

In this poster, we propose a novel information retrieval technique called “Cross-Age Information Retrieval”, which can be used to access old documents written in ancient language using a query in modern language. In the proposed method, we translate the query in modern language into ancient language using the similarity between entries in both ancient and modern language dictionaries. The results of the preliminary experiments of translation show that accuracy of the proposed method is still far from practical use, but the user survey suggests that our proposed method might become a promising method for improving access to ancient documents both for novice and expert users.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Poster

Keywords

other
digital media in time and space

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

"Interdisciplinary Speed Dating"

Pierre Auboiron and Torsten Reimer

(Submission #34)


Summary

Research in both the Humanities and Arts is increasingly dominated by specialisation. While this can lead to excellent international contacts within a highly specialised subject field, it can also mean that contacts to other fields of research in the same discipline, and especially beyond, are neglected. Specialisation also makes it harder to understand where to look for partners that might share a specific research interest from the angle of another discipline.

With recent trends in funding, collaborative work will be even more important, especially where ICT is involved. Researchers and practitioners from the arts and especially the humanities need to be able to leave the idea of the solitary reseacher behind and develop a more collaborative way of working. On a European level such a portal would promote discussion around new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Based on the initiatives carried out by the European Commission within the framework of the eTwinning Action for school-level partnerships, this paper shows that the results of this action are transferable to Higher Education and Research communities and may be the most efficient answer to the existing needs of researchers seeking interdisciplinary collaboration and to refine disciplinary boundaries thanks to ICT.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

FRESH OUT OF IDEAS. Generating new ideas from collaborative processes.

Lars Cuzner

(Submission #35)


Summary

Kulturverket works with processes of materializing experiences in a way that is meaningful to the participants. Our aim is to, in a distributed fashion, lead to performative results that communicate the experience of the contributors. We try to put emphasis on the feeling of a shared experiences with technology based distributed learning.

We create collaborative projects geared towards youth for cultural and educational institutions. We initiate and carry out projects where art plays the central part and where children literally tell professionals what to do. The ideas and content in the projects are by kids, but the results are performed by professionals. We use ICT to reach youth in collaborative environments that are accessable to them with tools that visualize their engagement.

Lars Cuzner, a cross-disciplinary new media artist, will show four collaborative and new media art projects, including, an opera written entirely in a blog and a generative art project that uses genetic algorithms to breed new proposals from a database of previously rejected proposals.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Learning lessons from the community. The Methods Network and the future needs of digital research

Laura Molloy and Torsten Reimer

(Submission #36)


Summary

The AHRC ICT Methods Network provided a national forum for the exchange of expertise in the use of ICT for arts and humanities research. During the interdisciplinary three year programme, some 50 workshops and seminars were held; a majority of these were organised by the community through an open call. Based on a series of qualitative interviews with the organisers of these events, we will look at the impact the Methods Network had on the community and especially at lessons learned in the course of the programme. We will make suggestions for funding strategies and a framework in which digital research can prosper. In particular, we will address the following questions:

- What is the impact of ICT on arts and humanities research in general?

- How does ICT enhance arts and humanities research?

- Are there differences between the various disciplines and between the arts and humanities in general?

- Has the use of ICT encouraged a redefinition of disciplinary boundaries?

- What are the risks of collaborative working and what is the role of ICT in this process?

- What are future needs of arts and humanities researchers?

- How do digital researchers envisage the future of their work?

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

Binding: The Everyday and the Implication of Women Portraiture on Intercultural Globalization.

Marcela Oteíza, Damla Hacaloglu and Cathia Pagotto

(Submission #37)


Summary

ABSTRACT:

Binding, The everyday and the implication of women portraiture in intercultural globalization is an international collaborative media installation performance, that seek to generate instances that virtually and globally expand the performative space, while focusing on local issues and their audiences. Using virtual performance software the project will consist of three simultaneous portraits/videos showing everyday activities of local women today, as well as those of their local counterparts from 100 years ago.

The portraits are of, (1) Latife Usakligil, a social and political women’s rights figure from Istanbul,Turkey (researcher Damla Hacoluglu); (2) Prudence Heward, a painter from Canada (researcher Cathia Pagotto); and (3) Laurinda C. Andrade, a Portuguese immigrant to New Bedford, USA (researcher Marcela Oteiza).

Through everyday actions, we seek to incorporate and re-contextualize the portraits of women through time both historically and within different cultures.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Text/Scale/Context/Content: How language circumscribes the generation and reception of art

Candida Elton

(Submission #38)


Summary

This paper is both a discursive interrogation of the textual history of a performance work, e.g. its description for commission, funding, or marketing purposes, its critique for evaluation or review purposes, and a critical analysis of the context-dependent content value of the same work. During the timeframe of this paper the work which is the subject of these texts plays concurrently.

The title of the work I will be screening and discussing is Falling. Falling is a dance film installation for large scale projection on city centre buildings. Designed to take dance out of traditional performance spaces and into the public sphere, Falling is intended to be shown at night time in a busy city centre, where it will be experienced incidentally.

By talking and showing simultaneously I will be interrogating the many interdependent relationships between the four words text, scale, context and content which provide a framework for this paper, using the history of this project as an example. What role do text, scale and context play in determining the content of an art work and in the public reception of that work?

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena
digital media in time and space

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Either/Or: Making Things Live Between Managers and Academics (A Case Study of York St John University’s C4C Collaborating for Creativity CETL Project)

Julia Smith and Sunil Manghani

(Submission #39)


Summary

This paper offers a dual perspective, from the point of view of the manager and academic, to assess how institutional aspiration for creativity and collaboration in the arts and humanities can be genuinely achieved. The underlying tenet is that operational needs – whether at institutional, faculty or project level – include not just the management, but equally the play of people, ideas, and resources. The phrase either/or (derived from the philosophy of Sřren Kierkegaard), is adopted as a leitmotif to focus attention upon the concrete exchanges that must take place in-between the temporality of the teaching context and the rationalist, strategic matrices of its management. The paper presents a case study of multiple digital initiatives orchestrated by C4C Collaborating for Creativity (a HEfCE funded Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at York St John University). The projects cover three main areas: Digital Making, Reflection and Archiving. Key recommendations to untie the rigidity of a management / academic divide are: (1) to situate dedicated support units outside of faculty; (2) to improve how academics devise projects through earlier collaboration with experts and practitioners; (3) to develop identifiable support roles, in particular to establish the role of Creative Directors to work alongside academics.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
policies and strategies for digital deployment
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

The AHRC ICT in Arts and Humanities Research Programme: looking back and forwards

David Robey, Lorna Hughes, Stuart Dunn, Tobias Blanke and Torsten Reimer

(Submission #40)


Summary

Launched by the AHRC in October 2003, now with funding of Ł3.8m, the AHRC ICT in Arts and Humanities Research Programme will run until September 2008, and will thus be almost at its end by the time of the DHRA conference. Its aims are to build national capacity in the use of ICT for arts and humanities research and to advise the AHRC on matters of ICT strategy. The purpose of this panel session will be to review the Programme's activities, to attempt an assessment of their achievements, and to consider the resulting lessons and prospects for the future. Between an Introduction and Conclusion by the Programme Director, the panel will comprise presentations by different colleagues on the three main strands of the ICT Programme: the ICT Methods Network, the ICT Strategy Projects, and the AHRC-EPSRC-JISC Arts and Humanities e-Science Initiative.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Panel Session

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
policies and strategies for digital deployment

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

The Virtual Deliberation System (VDS): A model for collaborative knowledge-production and data re-use in the humanities using Web 2.0 tools

Craig Bellamy

(Submission #41)


Summary

The application of diverse forms of eInfrastructure to support research has a long history dating back to the 1960s; in fact the genesis of eInfrastructure in the shape of Internet was largely driven by the needs of the research community (Bellamy and Falk; 2008). During this latest stage of eInfrastructure development we are again witnessing large scale investments in new capacities; such as data and computational grids, federated repositories, and high-end collaborative eScience and eResearch projects to support research across institutional, regional, and disciplinary boundaries. However, there is still much work to be undertaken to discover the methods required to build productive relationships between eInfrastructure and humanities users. In this presentation I will demonstrate a number of tools and methods to assist humanities researchers collaborate and re-use research data within a deliberative framework. It is the argument of this paper that without a framework that foregrounds deliberation as an essential component of work within the humanities, then the central issues of how knowledge is advanced collaboratively remains invisible. It is here that this research has significance

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (RTF)]  

TRANSDISCIPLINARY /TRANSMEDIA /TRANSGENDER POLITICS: REDEFING THE ANATOMY OF THE SOCIAL BODY

Jaime del Val

(Submission #42)


Summary

Redefining disciplinary boundaries means to redesign the anatomy of the social body and its political economy. Disciplines are machines for the production of power strata. They produce the social organism as power machine, they produce the humanist fiction of the subject, with its mind-body split, its functional design in terms of reproduction, work, perception and understanding, it produces the very concept of logos, of rational thinking as prosthesis and the destruction machines through which it asserts itself as superior to other forms of intelligence or affect.

Biopower needs to maintain disciplinary boundaries as the artificial boundaries, the phantom of a lost disciplinary society, which acts however as the seducing element on the surface of the otherwise empty market structures, they apparently fill the empty shell of the market with meaning. On the other hand the economy has been organised in terms of organisms, of blocking the uncontrollable proliferation of knowledges of realities, of setting boundaries to the flows and interactions between the bodies.

What is needed: Transdisciplinary research groups, production, education and diffusion platforms: open platforms of TRANSLATION between disciplines. Example: The Workshop of the Technologies of the Body of REVERSO. Rethink financing and political economy: contaminating all spaces whilst retaining an independence. The production of specific and embodied technologies, as opposed to standard technologies that attempt to foster the fiction of the disembodied subject.

A practical case study: Microdances A brief presentation of the project Microdances and the activity of REVERSO.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
policies and strategies for digital deployment
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

ANTIBODIES OF SURVEILLANCE__MICRODANCES

Jaime del Val

(Submission #43)


Summary

ANTIBODIES OF SURVEILLANCE__MICRODANCES is a metaformance (interactive, expanded, participatory__performance, installation and spatial intervention) that uses wireless micro surveillance cameras on the naked body as interface to explore micro scales of movement and representations that hover on the edge of the abstract, of the unintelligible, where the discursive boundaries of the body, the normative territories of surveillance, collapse in the realm of the amorphous. The images, projected onto large translucent screens like a landscape of moving body fragments, are analysed in real time and the outcoming movement parameters process the voice of the performers, spatialised in four channels, distorted until it becomes a fluid landscape, a granular chorus of multiple voices. Performers, wearing partial illumination on their bodies are immersed in the same space with the audience, surrounded by large projections and sound, an intimate space for an intimate interface, where the performers move and interact with each other, and with the audience, whose skin may become part of the landscape, generating new uncertain possibilities of (post-intimate) relation.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

other
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Digital technologies in architectural education: a positive critical point of view.

Melina Giannakis and Adam Cowley

(Submission #44)


Summary

This paper explores the uses and effects of digital technologies and their different inter-relationship within architectural teaching and learning, from a tutor’s point of view as well as from a student’s one. Through contextual inquiries and exploratory observations of the design studio and the nature of architecture itself this paper also shows how the design and narrative of a project is informed by the tools and techniques used and vice-versa. It also demonstrates the possibilities, limits and restrictions of the use of ICT in architectural education. This paper will critically explore dialectic relationships between contents, methods, teaching/learning styles; process-product mechanisms; problem representations vs. exploring solutions; competition vs. collaboration; and the tools used by studio educators to achieve their studio teaching objectives.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

4D [3D + time] urban historical reconstructions and visual representation of time

Melina Giannakis

(Submission #45)


Summary

Few intellectual problems are as intriguing as understanding the nature of time, even if everybody seems to know what this essential word means precisely. We deal with time constantly; time is a universal and fundamental aspect of existence, necessarily experienced by all human beings in its modes of past, present and future (Husserl); but it is still a complex concept to define, describe and formalize. One of the challenge in the research introduced in this paper is to create a framework for graphically representing such elusive and subjective seeming phenomena - time depending phenomena - in 3D reconstructed urban computer models, and to evaluate the uses and utilities within several disciplines in Arts and Humanities and Sciences, including urban management and Cultural Heritage, to avoid the knowledge gap that is often being built between fields of study. This paper presents further results on the research on 4D historical urban reconstructions, i.e. 3D changes through time in computer modelling, in a particular area of the City of London, UK. We give an overview, with the support of different kind of digital media, of the ways it is possible to investigate and [sometimes] represent time in a three-dimensional digital world, in a historical context.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
digital media in time and space
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

Using a Virtual Learning Environment in Language Teaching

Christophe Gagne

(Submission #46)


Summary

At the University of Cambridge, CamTools is the VLE used by the university members. CamTools puts together a number of useful tools, designed by and for academics, in one framework. CamTools sites are protected by passwords, which means that only those people selected will be able to see a specific site.

For language teaching, and in this instance the teaching of French, CamTools is a way to deliver online multimedia teaching to students. It works as a document store to share with students, it allows group communication including discussion boards, real-time chat, announcements, and an email list with archive, and tools for collaboratively writing documents.

Teaching is made both more democratic and individual as every member of a group can contribute and specific questions can be addressed. The VLE provides users with information about the syllabus and weekly course work (references to related sites, books and articles) as well as online exercises. CamTools has various pedagogical benefits: it is a way of ensuring that students use contemporary multimedia material and develop a wide array of skills (reading, writing, listening). Finally, CamTools also increases the sense of belonging to a community of learners.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship


Grid-enabling Humanities Data – A critical perspective

Tobias Blanke and Mark Hedges

(Submission #48)


Summary

Like many vogue expressions of technological origin, 'grid-enabling' is a term that is sometimes (or even often) used without a clear idea of what is meant. The name Grid originates from the electrical power grid. It stands for a vision about future computer infrastructures: Advanced networks should allow access to computing technologies to become as ubiquitous as access to electrical power. The users should be able to just plug in and play with an underlying pervasive infrastructure. They should not have to care where the computing power comes from. The required services should be readily available although the local desktop might not itself be able to deliver them. This paper critically evaluates what this all might have to do with the work of a humanist by comparing two standard ways of 'grid-enabling'. We will compare a combination of the data grid technology iRODS with the digital repository system Fedora, which is already used in several digital humanities projects, with a more grid standards based approach using the Open Grid Service Architecture – Data Access Integration standard (OGSA-DAI).

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
cataloguing and metadata aspects of resource discovery
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Companion to Digital Literary Studies: New

Susan Schreibman, James Cummings, Alan Liu, John Walsh and Ray Siemens

(Submission #49)


Summary

This panel will offer four perspectives from the recently published Companion to Digital Literary Studies (Blackwell 2008). As a collection of some 30 chapters, it covers a broad range of interests found in the field of literary studies and their confluence with the creative activities, analytical methodologies, and disseminative possibilities presented by computation and the electronic medium . Participants will investigate the term ‘digital literary studies’, which, it can be argued, may not do sufficient justice to what is a meeting of interests that, it may be argued, represents the most important change occurring in the field of literary studies today. They will also discuss the specific approach that their chapters covered, as well as the changes in the field since their essays were completed. The Editors of the Companion will provide an overview of the book as a whole.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Panel Session

Keywords

redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
encoding standards
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Learning from Experience. The Challenges of Collaborative Practice

Bo Reimer

(Submission #50)


Summary

New digital technology and new forms of digital media are changing the media landscape, and changing the way people interact with media. This is tied to an emergence of new creative practices – and to new forms of knowledge production. What does this mean for academic work?

In this paper, I will discuss this question, taking my point of departure in the work conducted at The School of Arts and Communication (K3), Malmö university, for the last decade. This is work that has been conducted crossdisciplinary, but also in collaboration with actors within the public sector and the business sector, with different types of organizations as well as with citizens.

Based on the experiences of these projects, in my presentation I will discuss the challenges that researchers face when working collaboratively with actors outside of academia. This means addressing questions such as: What kinds of knowledge are produced through collaborative practice? What kinds of communities are created? I will also argue for the need for the necessity of problematizing the notion of academic practice and for the need of experimenting with new ways of both producing and representing knowledge.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

R3/\/\1X\/\/0RX: a blog for the creative remixing of media

babel (aka Chris Joseph), crissxross (aka Christine Wilks) and runran (aka Randy Adams)

(Submission #51)


Summary

In the spirit of open collaboration, several media artists and writers from around the world have agreed to work together using open source WordPress blogging software. Since its inception in November 2006, R3/\/\1X\/\/0RX has grown to include well over 300 pieces, many are strewn about in comment areas: audio, animations, digital images, visual poetry and texts. Where possible each new piece is remixed, literally or conceptually, from others on the site and linked to the appropriate page(s), but new work is welcome too because R3/\/\1X\/\/0RX needs to be fed. Source material is made available and all media is freely given to be remixed. Thus, the project has no single author. There’s a kind of simultaneous duality in operation - each artist/writer is working independently as a solitary creator but they are also collaborating in an extended improvisation, making the entire site, collectively, a work of asynchronous co-creation. R3/\/\1X\/\/0RX can be viewed as an online journal of digital art and writing - alive, interactive, and media rich.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

Writing with Her Body: Transference of Movement, Spectacle and Meaning through Technology

Gregory Sporton and Carla Wright

(Submission #52)


Summary

When the American dancer Loie Fuller first appeared in Paris, she created a sensation. Her performances combined her graceful physical presence with the latest in stage technology, including lighting devices and gel colours (for which she often owned patents), augmented by prosthetics and vast quantities of silk that extended her body and the flow of her movement. The Symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé, inspired by her performance, described her as 'writing with her body' providing a rich starting point for the transference of literary concepts into performance.

With Fuller's example in mind, the VRU have been working on practical techniques in networked art-making, combining this with motion capture technologies, to give form to Mallarmé's famous phrase. The team will present live practical examples and discuss the issues that arise when the moving body is augmented by network technology, giving new meaning to the intellectual conceit of dance as text.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.


Born Digital: Dance in the Digital Age

Ross Varney, Sarah Whatley and Paul Allender

(Submission #53)


Summary

This paper will explore the convergence of dance and digital technologies with reference to a current project that is bringing together a leading choreographer and a team of researchers to create an online digital archive. The key question that the paper will address is whether a re-examination of digital technology in relation to its representation of the corporeal, coupled with a widening knowledge base and acceptance by creators and audiences of 'experiencing' performance within radically redefined spheres, will encourage and assist a new generation of 'born digital' dancers and choreographers in obtaining the necessary skills and experience of digital performativity to enable them to develop and engage with much more intuitive digital tools designed to support and expand the horizons of the choreographic process.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
policies and strategies for digital deployment
digitisation techniques and problems
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
cataloguing and metadata aspects of resource discovery

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

The ADCT ArtSci Projects

Dew Harrison and Sarah Mount

(Submission #54)


Summary

The ADCT research group at the University of Wolverhampton integrates scientists with artists and designers in a cross-disciplinary approach. This enables collaborations using high-technology with aesthetic considerations and creative innovation. The group’s main focus is upon technology as facilitator, delivering creative content within discursive narrative environments.

Partnerships, outside the HE sector, are needed to further our research in this area, and we are approaching interested parties to widen our current network of museums, galleries, organizations, researchers, heritage sites, places of public interest etc. The network will then be activated through regular meetings, workshops and symposia, and is to be seminal in determining spaces for experiment and feedback in the public domain, through negotiation with its members.

One example of our projects currently underway is “SensorScape”, where we are working together to extend and test knowledge on wireless sensor networks as creative devices, or ‘plug-ins’, for artists, designers and curators interested in augmenting visitor/audience experience and facilitating the transfer of knowledge, beyond a text explanation, within the museum or gallery context.

We would like to present this, together with other projects which concern our ‘Second Life’ Island, at the DRHA conference for discussion and critical engagement with your delegates.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
interactivity and performance
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena
digital media in time and space


Voyaging into the Built Heritage: Interactive Experiences of Historic Architecture and its Perceptual Implications

Banu Pekol

(Submission #55)


Summary

The idea that aesthetic perception cannot be achieved without the inclusion and application of digital interactive technology forms the basis of this paper. When re-interpreting a historical building, it is important to be as creative as when designing a new building. I am proposing to interpret the built heritage through digital interactive technology. The perception of spatial volume, which is the essence of architecture, is dependent on the viewer obtaining as many different perspectives through movement as possible. Through the use of the graphic programming environment Isadora, the structure can reveal itself through a ‘journey’ inside it, a journey that never repeats itself twice, similar to walking around architecture today, yet radically different in that the rules of gravity do not apply. However, this is no simple fly-through. The program is written to be interactive, rather than just generating action-reaction behaviours. The space will suggest a particular way of movement to the voyager and with this suggestion it will reveal that which it is harmonious with, and anything that prevents it will seem out of place.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Travelling hopefully, making work. A comparison of two artists’ approach to digital narrative.

Katharine Norman

(Submission #56)


Summary

In a small case study I discover that, though separated by some thirty years, Andy Campbell and Paul Lansky — two artists who work digitally with words, from a visual and aural approach respectively — both appear to have come to the digital via comparable artistic ‘imperatives’. In addition, both convey remarkably congruent intentions with regard to their reader/viewer/listener. My reasons for presenting this informal investigation are not so much to analyse the works or draw any firm conclusions (or at least not in this particular context), as to consider how disciplinary boundaries might be smudged when thinking, and writing, about digital narratives in works where text is integral, but does not necessarily have primacy. My contention is that perhaps a focus on reception and subjective engagement with digital work has a lot to offer as a means to explore cross- and trans- disciplinary media literary-ness (rather than simply media literacy).

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

The Virtually Concluded : Justifying Disparity and tackling the Persuasive Visualisation

Rachel Hann

(Submission #57)


Summary

This paper is a response to a series of problems encountered during my practical investigation into unrealised Utopian theatre architecture. Specifically, they concern my choice of methodological tool, computer-based visualisation.

The current methodological practice within the field of visualisation for research in the humanities, prioritises outcome-based research over processed-based alternatives. The visualised outcome may fulfil the hypothetical goal of producing an experiential three-dimensional reality, however, it is the nature of this outcome to persuade the reader into perceiving the visualised as definitive ‘truth’. It is this phenomena that invokes a masking of the products true form, as an argument based upon a critical academic study.

Both in response to Hugh Denard’s work on the persuasive visualisation and my own practical endeavours, this paper shall present some possible directions for researchers to taken into consideration when tacking the problems of access and transparency. This response is intersected with my own argument toward establishing the act of visualisation as a valid research methodology.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

digitisation techniques and problems
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Islands of One

Katharine Norman

(Submission #58)


Summary

[ note to selection panel: I'm submitting a link to the online version of a sound-text work. It could be presented as a performance (over loudspeakers, as a piece of electroacoustic sound art) or via a computer with good headphones, as a workstation/installation.

It is purely aural, apart from the web page for the online version.

http://www.stayconscious.com/islandsofone/index.html

This piece is by way of aural digital/electronic literature. It is quite a sombre, serious work and probably best only if you are putting a concert/sound work event together as part of the conference.]

Programme notes:

Islands of One (four short stories about mind and body)

1. What is this island?

2. One way or the other

3. Sparkling, gossamer (this was how it seemed)

4. You think you know what you’re doing

Created in 2006–7, the inspiration for these four linked pieces came from my experience of becoming seriously physically ill while living on an island. The stories (like my post-recovery reflection on hallucinating wildly) became a consideration of mind and body—not so much the more traditionally held dualist notions, but rather a meditation on the fragility of whatever thread it is that holds our sense of self, and reality, together. The text is my own (as is the voice), and most other sounds are recordings from my then home, Pender Island, British Columbia.

Although the piece can certainly be performed over loudspeakers, Islands of One is perhaps best suited to a more intimate listening, one-to-one over headphones.

Katharine Norman

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

other


The choreographer: the nomadic passenger.

Gretchen Schiller

(Submission #59)


Summary

Within the context of the conference New Knowledges and Practices, this paper proposes to highlight the idiosyncratic interdisciplinary nature of the 'circulari' videodance and landscape architecture collaborative project. Dance and landscape architecture artworks have historical precedence in the works of choreographers such as Anna Halprin (1920-) and Japanese Kai Ta Kei (1939-). These choreographers amongst others have created new methods of practice by linking dance and site specific outdoor environments.

'circulari' takes Halprin and Kei’s work in another choreographic and conceptual direction where videodance and landscape architecture together focus on the kinaesthetic residues that can be carried from one place to another. How can kinaesthetic sensations be transplanted? How do they transform across performative and digital materials? What narratives are formed as the singular nomad body materializes as a collective body?

This paper and visual presentation of circulari presented at L.A.C, Lieux d’art contemporain in France, 2008 will discuss these questions as well as critically review the ways in which the artistic collaborative process infected or affected videodance and landscape architecture. Do new hybrid techniques and practices emerge?

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

The Vitruvian World

Michael Takeo Magruder, Drew Baker and David Steele

(Submission #60)


Summary

Permanent URL: http://www.turbulence.org/Works/vitruvianworld/

Documentation DVD: http://www.takeo.org/downloads/Takeo_the-vitruvian-world_DVD_21117.iso

Context:

In the 1st century BC, Roman writer, architect and engineer Vitruvius codified specific building formulae based on the guiding principles of strength, utility and beauty. He believed that architecture was intrinsically linked to nature and was a human imitation of cosmic order. The most well-known interpretation of this postulate is the Vitruvian Man by Leonardo da Vinci in which the male form is depicted in unity with the square and circle - representing material and spiritual existence respectively.

This tripartite union of human body, material form and spiritual essence maintains relevance within the current climate of distributed presences, mixed realities and internet cultures. The proliferation of synthetic worlds and virtual constructs engendered by our ubiquitous technology provides new realms for both actual existence and creative exploration.

The Vitruvian World is a multi-nodal and recursive artwork that embodies the principles of Vitruvius within this context. Existing in three distinct yet interconnected spaces, the work simultaneously embraces the virtual, the physical, and the network connecting them.

Supported by:

The Vitruvian World is a 2007 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web site. It was made possible with funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and generous support from the Huret & Spector Gallery, Emerson College and King’s Visualisation Lab, Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King’s College London.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Installation

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

The role of Unpredictability in Musical Creativity

John Ferguson and Paul Bell

(Submission #61)


Summary

Tron Lennon represents the collaborative work of John Ferguson and Paul Bell Working beyond a paradigm where musicians perform pre-composed works, we celebrate spontaneity and the ephemeral nature of sound. As a guitarist and DJ we have spent four years extending our practice through free improvisation and live audio visual experimentation. In exploring indeterminate and dysfunctional systems alongside more direct causal gesture, we embrace unpredictability as a strategy to probe, provoke and generate creative response. We seek to uncover hidden and unintended potentials in seemingly fixed media, exposing instability, contradiction and formulating new roles for what a live musician is, or could be. The specificity of our individual aesthetics causes contradiction within this collaborative project and leads to agonistic modes of engagement in which our pluralistic approach celebrates inevitable conflict. This is laid bare in every performance where dialogue can appear both cohesive and broken. Our DRHA presentation will raise numerous questions about collaborative research, feeding into a concluding discussion for future practical work.

www.tronlennon.co.uk

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Visualising archival data: the opportunities of Web 2.0 to enhance teaching and research of First World War literature

Alun Edwards

(Submission #62)


Summary

A quickfire session offering a unique opportunity to sneak a preview of the digital archive of First World War Poetry and the Great War Archive just weeks before their official launch on the 90th anniversary of the Armistice.

The exciting potential and the pedagogical opportunities of integrating and deploying these digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship are now being realised. The session will show the tutorials under construction and illustrate the collaboration of the project with 'Intute'.

Resources freely-available on the Internet have been displayed using Intute's technologies for collaboration and user-generated content (UGC) – an actual serious application of Web 2.0, showing how Intute and the First World War Poetry Digital Archive have added to the collective knowledge of the subject online.

The demonstration will touch lightly on the project's future plans to investigate and exemplify how existing Web 2.0 tools can be utilised to 'visualise archival data'.

The quick fire session will conclude with a preview of the ultimate in user-generated content – a community collection of memories and artefacts about the war uploaded to the Great War Archive by hundreds of members of the public during March-June 2008.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Poster

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
policies and strategies for digital deployment
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
cataloguing and metadata aspects of resource discovery
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

Tron Lennon: Improvisation

Paul Bell and John Ferguson

(Submission #63)


Summary

Music emerges from the spontaneous communication between John and Paul, their individual interactions with the singularities of their instruments, and the seemingly autonomous nature of their chosen materials. Paul’s turntable-centric ecology deals exclusively with pre-existing materials. His practice could be considered a creative response to an increasingly mediatised world, a world in which recordings accost and saturate us daily. Embracing collage as a creative strategy he deconstructs at the turntable, renegotiating audio-visual materials in new live performance contexts. The result is a plunderphonic aesthetic that surmounts the fixity of the source materials through physical intervention, putting agency back into that which we have lost through acousmatic listening and the act of recording. The guitar, due to its wearable nature, is at the centre of John’s ecology, this is one element of a multi-faceted setup that includes assorted pedals, circuit-bent keyboards and other paraphernalia. Alongside breadboard patching and performing with light sensors, his application of wireless gaming technology foregrounds uncontrollability in interface design, querying the role of gesture and the legibility of its transmission. As part of an aesthetic that embraces both intentional and unintended activity, this explores the potential for unpredictability as a catalyst for interaction in live electronic music.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
interactivity and performance
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Other Animals

Deke Weaver

(Submission #64)


Summary

Approximately 65 minutes long, this piece includes three monologs and two animated video projections. Like a collection of short stories, each narrative echoing off the others, the work weaves human foibles, strength and technologies through animal nature. The piece uses the skills of my past life as an animator/designer for broadcast television. The set is limited to a black chair, a microphone (with stand), a projection screen, and a video monitor on a skateboard. The heat, immediacy and messiness of the Live is complemented by the cooler medium of the projected moving image. The projections lend the luminous quality of first-person film and the hypnotic, intimate voice found in radio narratives. Absurd, provocative and haunting the work embraces the freedom of challenging theatrical norms and elevating the ancient form of storytelling through crossdisciplinary practice. But multi/cross/inter/disciplinary doesn’t interest me as an end in itself. At the core of my work is a passionate commitment to a performance-theater of fierce transformative emotion: make ’em laugh, make ’em cry.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

other
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

The mememe in Collaboration

Dave Lawrence, Tine Bech, Sam Woolf and David Theriault

(Submission #65)


Summary

In November 2006 the authors exhibited an interactive art installation at the international Digital Arts Festival, Aarhus, Denmark.

The paper has a focus on collaboration and the associated experiences – from the perspectives of the various roles in the team – artist, technologist, software specialist, technician, consultant, commercial business, fund raiser, project manager.

The Mememe (as in ‘me me me – choose me!’) installation combines sculpture and sound with leading edge radio wave tracking technology. The audience wear specially designed shoes fitted with tags tracked by sensors placed around the room – the position and type of movement of the shoes trigger various sounds and combinations of sounds (with each pair of shoes having its own set of sounds, and ‘sound identity’).

The paper begins with a review of the literature in this area, followed by a reflective discussion encompassing the following:

Interdisciplinary matters Personalities, habits, and individual preferences Knowledge transfer Ownership, delegation, and trust Communication Skill base ‘meshing’ Online Vs face-to-face Project managing Role perspectives

The paper concludes with several recommendations for those engaged or likely to be engaged in such a project situation.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
interactivity and performance
digitisation techniques and problems
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Digitópia - Platform for the Development of Digital Music Communities

Rui Penha, Paulo Maria Rodrigues, Fabien Gouyon, Luís Gustavo Martins, Carlos Guedes and Álvaro Barbosa

(Submission #66)


Summary

Some of the most interesting recent developments in music are related to the fact that ordinary computers and mobile devices acquired capabilities to make, record, store and spread music, while becoming available to a grater number of people. An “active relationship” with music is nowadays within the reach of people that did not go through the process of formal musical education, due to an increasing number of software applications that allow creating and making music in a friendly and intuitive manner. We are witnessing a true worldwide revolution in the way we create, perform, spread, listen and learn music. The project Digitópia - Platform for the Development of Digital Music Communities - aims to explore these surges of development in a facility implemented in Casa da Música´s main entrance hall, which will contribute: 1) to develop music and creativity amongst a range of ages and social conditions, and mostly amongst youth; 2) to foster the development of free music software; 3) to promote social inclusion, and lead to the emergence of multicultural communities of music makers/lovers; 4) to promote free musical content.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Poster

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
policies and strategies for digital deployment
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
intellectual property rights

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

BLUE: an exploration of the making of a duet between a woman and a phenomenal animation.

Mary Oliver, Niki Woods and Rozi Fuller

(Submission #67)


Summary

The ‘human-animation-interface’ has been largely excluded from experimental performance modes since its humble origins in early Edison experiments (1900) and Winsor McKay, Vaudeville (1912). Animation within avant-garde performance has been subject to what Esther Leslie calls ‘a phoney war between high and low culture’. If her claim is true it goes some way to explain why it has taken so long for experimental animation processes to re-enter contemporary performance practice.

This presentation will present the findings of an AHRC Practice-as-Research project which has sought to establish the interactive qualities necessary to bring about a successful empathetic relationship between human and machine driven entity. The presentation by Mary Oliver (Writer-Director), Niki Woods (Associate Artist Blast Theory) and Rozi Fuller (Liquid Studios) will explore the collaborative processes of engagement which have become a test bed for exploring notions of interactivity between human and digital animation within the live performance setting. Shifting beyond its techne origins to the quest for a meaningful interrelationship of human and animation, this research project addresses what Gabriella Giannachi describes as the post human ‘at once multiple and fragmented’ and offers a model for new methods of production.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
digitisation techniques and problems
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

BLUE: A PERFORMANCE WITH A WOMAN AND A PHENOMENAL ANIMATION

Mary Oliver, Niki Woods and Rozi Fuller

(Submission #68)


Summary

BLUE: A PERFORMANCE WITH A WOMAN AND A PHENOMENAL ANIMATION

As part of an AHRC funded Practice as Research project, this experiment in performing with digital animations, introduces the potential for a vast new range of virtual performers. Following directly on from Mary Oliver’s most recent work in which she performs with her cartoon self, the formal relationship between human and virtual character is further abstracted in this new work. Blue is a creative collaboration between devisor/director Mary Oliver, performer Niki Woods (Associate Artist Blast Theory) and Rozi Fuller (Liquid Studios). It is a test bed for exploring modes of interactivity between human and digital illustration and while such physical relationships have been explored within filmic form, we are still at a relatively new stage in developments in three dimensional settings. The expanded industrial relationship has produced extraordinary empathetic results between what Eisenstein referred to as the ability of animation to address “the development of the human from blob to limbed entity”. In Blue we observe the wondrous relationship of human presence in duet with the phenomenal animated performer. The work both references the 19th Century beginnings of experiments in film and theatre interactions whilst acknowledging the fracturing and displacement of the 21st century body.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Swift Traces: Kinesis, Digitally Inscribed

Kirk Woolford

(Submission #69)


Summary

“Swift Traces: Kinesis, Digitally Inscribed” describes the creation of the Swift Traces installation and the underlying research into relationships drawing, writing, and human motion in Chinese and Western cultures.

The paper gives a brief overview of the Chinese cursive form of calligraphic writing known as Cao Shu or “Swift Style” where the legibility of the character is less important than it’s expressiveness. It explains how in Chinese calligraphy, not only does each character have specific meanings and connotations, but each is written/drawn in a very specific pattern. The paper looks at the relationship between using these patterns as a choreographic tool and the use of English characters used by Forsyth in his Improvisational Technologies.

Finally, the paper explains the structure of the installation, the differences between Chinese and Western elements, and how characters are generated through a combination of pre-recorded motion capture data, scanned images of calligraphic brush strokes, the movement of viewers in front of the panel, and the characteristics of the element the panel represents.

In addition the this formal paper, I propose to set up a single panel of the installation at DRHA.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

Swift Traces

Kirk Woolford

(Submission #70)


Summary

The Swift Traces installation explores relationships between drawing, writing, and human motion in Chinese and Western cultures. It uses the Chinese cursive form of calligraphic writing known as Cao Shu or “Swift Style” as a choreographic tool linking to the work of Bill Forsyth and the choreographic system he outlines in Improvisational Technologies. In Chinese calligraphy, not only does each character have specific meanings and connotations, but each is written/drawn in a very specific pattern. Cao Shu is a fluid, expressive form of calligraphy where the legibility of the character is less important than it’s expressiveness.

The installation consists of six panels relating to the three shared (Fire, Water, Earth) and three distinct (Wood, Metal, Air) elements in Chinese and Western Cultures. On each panel, the installation draws characters generated through a combination of pre-recorded motion capture data, scanned images of calligraphic brush strokes, the movement of viewers in front of the panel, and the characteristics of the element the panel represents.

I propose to set up a single panel at DRHA to give an impression of the installation and to deliver a formal paper detailing its creation and reflecting on its associations and meanings.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Installation

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

“Quivering Web of Living Thought”: Mapping the Conceptual Networks of Swinburne's Songs of the Springtides

John A. Walsh, Pin Sym Pin Sym Foong, Kshitiz Anand and Vignesh Ramesh

(Submission #71)


Summary

Our paper will discuss conceptual networks present in Victorian poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's mid-career collection Songs of the Springtides (1880) and how those networks may be represented in TEI P5 XML markup and graphic visualizations driven by the encoded text.

Swinburne’s work is full of familiar signposts and nodes. Swinburne's familiar binary oppositions; the many mythical and legendary references; the historical figures who are eulogized in the elegies and praised in the many tributes and dedications; the pervasive symbols of song and the sea: these elements of Swinburne’s verse all serve as familiar, easily identifiable nodes of information, laden with meaning acquired through strategic repetition and structural integration into the intellectual networks of Swinburne’s work.

Songs of the Springtides is an artful example of a deliberately architected whole connected by complex discourse networks of key concepts that operate within and across the individual poems.

We will include a detailed discussion of Songs of the Springtides as a information system, supported by a framework of internal and external discourse networks. Following this theoretical discussion of Swinburne's volume, we will review and illustrate the TEI P5 mechanisms used to encode the networks and demonstrate the web-based visualization of the text.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encoding standards

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[Proposal (RTF)]  

Hearing the Sonic Walden in Second Life

Phylis Johnson

(Submission #72)


Summary

In this presentation, my central focus is to explore the use of sound in Second Life as it is designed to provide a social and physical context to viewers’ experiences. Particularly, the use of ambient sound as a means to create a sense of place is a primary thread to this discussion. In the platform Second Life, ambient sound, noises, music, and voice interplay within virtual landscapes to convey emotions that draw upon our audible past (Sterne, 2004). Indeed, how might one interpret certain sounds and soundscapes associated within these constructed spaces, and, more generally how is sound interwoven into the textual and visual messages created in Second Life to shape the context of the viewer’s experience at a particular event or activity? Might sound within such an environment be merely an extension of cultural vibrations that have inspired new ways of listening and composing? Schafer (1977), Cage (1961; 2005), and other sound theorists point toward Transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau’s Walden as critical reading for any worthy debate on the relevance of sound in our lives. Sound in Second Life borrows from our imaginations and creates an eco-fantasy perhaps reminiscent of once pristine environments. Might Second Life provide such a sonic sandbox or a sonic Walden that inspires a re-listening to our environment.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
digital media in time and space

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

DSpace@Cambridge - repository services in a multimedia environment

Elin Stangeland

(Submission #73)


Summary

In this presentation we will describe the DSpace@Cambridge services and possible use scenarios as seen from an arts and humanities perspective. The second part will focus on one project in particular, the Freeze Frame Project from the Scott Polar Research Institute.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

digital media in time and space
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

HumSlides 2.0: a second generation on-line collaborative image resource for teaching and research.

Simon Mahony

(Submission #74)


Summary

This paper takes as its starting point a study that was presented at DRHA06 on the setting up of a digital image collection to support teaching, learning, and research in the department of Classics at King’s College London. With new web based technologies we now have the opportunity to apply the lessons learned from that pilot project and with second generation web infrastructures there are new possibilities for making this a more useful resource by addressing the shortcomings of the original project, particularly in the area of collaboration and the dynamic editing of both content and metadata. With these new technologies the user community itself can become a valuable resource particularly in the area of the correction and enrichment of the metadata. The collection becomes a collaborative environment with opportunities for critical engagement by the users. All academic disciplines make extensive use of images to illustrate teaching and support learning, make comparisons, and assist research so although this project uses materials from Classics the model that develops will be of benefit to many other academic areas. Digital media are taking over from traditional slide based delivery and offer significantly greater opportunities for the use of images in teaching and research.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Digital Classics: the history and future of a community?

Gabriel Bodard

(Submission #75)


Summary

Most collected studies of the use of technology in Classical research, have focused either on the history of the discipline, which has been a forerunner in computerized research since Packard's Ovid concordance (published in 1968), the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae and Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (both founded 1972) onwards. On the one hand the Solomon collection is a history of digital resources in Classical Studies, with retrospective papers by the founders of many of the great projects of the 1970s and 80s. On the other, the Scaife Festschrift looks forward, explicitly imagining Classical Studies in 2018, but from the point of view of a very specific technological perspective: the scale and power of cyber-infrastructure. This looking to the past and to the future are an essential part of the definition of any discipline, both calling attention, in different ways, to the state of play at present. In this paper I shall explore the nature of digital Classics and the Digital Classicist, a community that has its roots both in humanities and applied computing (via the Centre for Computing in the Humanities at KCL) and in Classics and digital publication and research (via the Stoa Consortium in Kentucky).

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Visual GISting: Merging Corpus Linguistics and Geographical Information Systems

Ian Gregory and Andrew Hardie

(Submission #76)


Summary

Corpus linguistics is concerned with using computer techniques to analyse a large body of text known as a corpus. The fundamental question asked is “what is the nature of the language and text within this corpus?” Geographical Information Systems (GIS) takes a dataset, provides each item of data with a co-ordinate-based location, and explores the spatial pattern that the dataset contains. The fundamental question asked is “what are the spatial patterns within this dataset?” Traditionally corpus linguistics has largely ignored the spatial, while GIS has largely ignored qualitative data, particularly texts. In this paper we explore how the two fields can be brought together to allow the spatial patterns found in large bodies of text to be explored. In doing so we are adding the geographical to corpus linguistics and the textual to GIS. There are many potential applications of this to fields such as historical GIS, the application of GIS to historical research, as many of the sources used by historians are textual rather than quantitative, and can now be included into geographical analyses.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
digital media in time and space
digitisation techniques and problems
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

The UK's evolving e-infrastructure and the study of the past

Stuart Dunn

(Submission #77)


Summary

Historically, archaeology and classics have been naturally receptive to using and developing advanced Information and Communication Technology (ICT) tools and methods. Such use and development can be described as engagement with 'e-infrastructure'; the wider set of tools, services and technological applications which enable virtual communities like Digital Classicist. However, most of these applications have been isolated, not coordinated, and on the fly. This paper will review some of the most important of these developments nationally and internationally, and offer a critical assessment of how they can best serve research at each stage of the research cycle. It will be argued that this means more than simply linking content at the analysis stage (which has been the main focus of much recent disucssion of the issue), but also enabling new ways of engaging users with collaborative networking and publishing tools.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Training, Communities of Practice and Digital Humanities

Elpiniki Fragkouli

(Submission #78)


Summary

This paper aims to underline the importance of professional development and training as well as the value of creation of communities of practice regarding the uptake of ICT from academics in Arts and Humanities. There appears to be lack of organised professional development in HE and difficulties in collaborations among academics especially when it comes to Arts and Humanities and the ICT field. Data from the e-Uptake project will be presented to support the theoretical discussion taking place. It will be argued that academics do not have often many opportunities to attend training sessions related to ICT. They do value any ICT training programs, seminars and workshops that they are called to attend but they are more willing to participate if they are convinced that they will benefit their work. They are also more confident in their importance if they are recommended by colleagues whose work they appreciate and they welcome any kind of informal learning through interaction with other practitioners.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Lightweight Reuse of Digital Resources with VLMA: perspectives and challenges

Brian Fuchs, Amy Smith and Leif Isaksen

(Submission #79)


Summary

Digital research collections are an important asset in both research and teaching. Scholars and teachers in the Humanities and the Visual Arts typically make use of personal collections of digitised material gathered from a variety of sources such as the web, personal photography, and the collections of museums and archives. Maintaining a personal collection carries considerable costs/disadvantages. Personal material may be out of sync with that of the archives from which it is derived, metadata may be inaccurate, coverage may be lacunose; not to mention the expense and time involved in maintaining such a collection. This paper reviews the needs for and uses of distributed collections of museum and archival digital objects in teaching and research, and looks at the solution offered by VLMA—the Virtual Lightbox for Museums and Archives (http://lkws1.rdg.ac.uk/vlma/)—a tool for creating and sharing distributed collections. Since the last development cycle of VLMA, there have been three promising areas of development in technology that affect the way in which digital resources in the arts and humanities are consumed: Metadata-sharing; Social Networking ; Web Applications. We will examine these developments both in terms of their impact for VLMA and more generally for re-use of museum digital resources.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Virtual Environments for Research in Archaeology: A Roman Case Study at Silchester

Emma O'Riordan, Mark Baker, Amanda Clarke, Claire Fisher, Michael Fulford, Mike Rains, Melissa Terras and Claire Warwick

(Submission #80)


Summary

This paper will present the results of implementing a Virtual Research Environment (VRE) in an on-going archaeological excavation with its associated publications and evaluate the implications that this has had for the associated research. VRE’s are basically a framework into which many types of tools and resources can be added. They can have many purposes, but perhaps the two most important are facilitating easier access to data and helping researchers manage the increasingly complex amounts and types of data that they have to work on. The Silchester Town Life project, started in 1997 and is run by the Department of Archaeology at the University of Reading as both a research and training excavation. The 3000m2 open area trench is a tiny portion of a once bustling urban Roman site located in modern day Hampshire. One thing that can be relied upon to produce a complex dataset is a long running, well established archaeological excavation and so the Silchester Town Life project makes an ideal candidate for testing the implementation of a VRE.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

A Virtual Research Environment for the Study of Documents and Manuscripts

John Pybus, Alan Bowman, Charles Crowther and Ruth Kirkham

(Submission #81)


Summary

The scholar interpreting an ancient documentary text has a broad range of relevant electronic tools available; but the interaction is largely in one direction and the experience is fragmented by the dispersal of the electronic resources. Decipherment and transcription are scholarly activities that naturally benefit from shared visualisation and multiple perspectives, but the potential of IT to mediate collaborative investigation has yet to be fully exploited. 'A VRE for the Study of Documents and Manuscripts' is a two-year JISC funded project designed to explore these challenges through the construction of an integrated collaborative environment for the study of ancient documentary artefacts. This paper describes the creation of a technical framework based on JSR-168 portal technology to provide a Virtual Research Environment, and its specific use to construct an environment for the study of documents and manuscripts. The workspace comprises a set of portlets which offer tools to access images, to view and annotate them in collaboration with other users of the system and to access related material to aid in their transcription and interpretation.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Digital Classicist panel: A discipline-specific community of practice and interdisciplinary methods

Gabriel Bodard, Stuart Dunn and Simon Mahony

(Submission #82)


Summary

This panel brings together several members of the Digital Classicist community with papers on a wide variety of topics. Although all different the papers demonstrate the collaborative nature of digital classics and exemplify a community of practice. They demonstrate the diversity of the individual members discipline areas but also their commonality, the sharing of knowledge and methodologies.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Panel Session

Keywords

redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

Building a Virtual Community – The Antiquist Experience

Leif Isaksen

(Submission #83)


Summary

This paper will be a Moderator’s perspective on the history and development of the Antiquist community, focussing both on it successes and those areas in which our efforts have been less successful. These will be discussed in the context of the community’s philosophy of open discussion and inclusivity, but are also intended to contribute to the wider discussion of community practices in the Arts and Humanities. The paper will enagage a number of open questions and it is also hoped that any ensuing discussion will provide new perspectives which can be taken back our community:

- What constitutes a community of practice and how do they differ from communities of correspondence?

- Are there means of benchmarking representation, and should we attempt to do so?

- Should members be encouraged to participate in a private or public role?

- What are the ethical considerations of communities that do not have a formalised membership procedure?

- What media are appropriate/relevant to such communities?

- How can such communities meaningfully cooperate with one another at an organisational level?

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

other
creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

Collecting collective knowledge: developing resources for the performing arts

Kate Dorney and Guy Baxter

(Submission #84)


Summary

This paper will discuss three collaborative projects the V&A Theatre Collections is engaged in which aim to deliver resources for the performing arts communities. These are the National Performance Database Project; the East London Theatre Archive project and Trading Faces: Recollecting Slavery. Each project has been formulated in conjunction with a range of partners: some from the HE and heritage sector and some from the performing arts and information services. The aim of the paper is to raise awareness of these initiatives, share experiences of collaborations across these sectors, and to gather feedback on future directions for the projects.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
cataloguing and metadata aspects of resource discovery
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena

Download

[Proposal (DOC)]  

virtureal - chatrooms, forums and electronic newspapers on house facades

marianne schmidt

(Submission #85)


Summary

Passing and staying people create together digital real- space discussion platforms on house facades. Those offer everyone the opportunity to participiate. With a projector, some cables and a laptop any environment can be trans- formed into an electronic newspaper or wall chat in real space . Conversations are created by different aspects like self-staging , anonumity and the idea of a not obligatory friedship of strangers. The work shows how difficult and simple communivation can be.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Performance

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
policies and strategies for digital deployment

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

Open Resources for the Humanities: Weaving History and Open Shakespeare

Jonathan Gray and Rufus Pollock

(Submission #86)


Summary

This paper will describe the Open Knowledge Foundation's work on open resources for the humanities - including projects such as Weaving History, a web application encouraging engagement with historical material using maps and timelines; and Open Shakespeare, a complete set of Shakespeare's works with an annotation tool, a concordance and ancillary material.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
digital media in time and space
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
intellectual property rights

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

Telling the 'Tale of Tales'

Maria Chatzichristodoulou

(Submission #89)


Summary

You are a deer. You live deep into the Endless Forest. You spend your time roaming around the forest with your friends, also deer.

What is The Endless Forest? Is it a story or a space? Is it the space of a story, the virtual world where a fairy-tale unfolds? Or is it the story of a space, a fairy-tale about this magical, endless forest? The Endless Forest (2005-) is a hybrid work-in-progress by the Belgium-based company Tale of Tales; a complex, multi-layered piece that resists easy categorization: it is a screensaver, an online multiplayer game, a live performance environment, a collective fairytale, and a social, virtual world.

For this paper, I will look at The Endless Forest as a narrative heterotopia, that is, as both an "effectively enacted utopia" (Foucault 1984) and a hyper-story. Making my way around the Forest, I will engage in and observe the parallel development of multiple micro-narratives. I will suggest that, in The Endless Forest, the (hetero-)space is the narrative and the other way round; also, that both space and narrative are relational, always in the process of becoming as the outcome of engagements, interactions and interrelations.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

lo-res and lo-fi - lessons from games development and cognitive science for the design and implementation of low bandwidth collaborative environments

gavin hogben

(Submission #90)


Summary

This paper discusses lessons from the game industry for the design and implementation of low bandwidth, lo-res, lo-fi, or 'selective fidelity' social and business communication/collaboration environments. In particular, it examines the key narrative, suspense, reward and community-building factors in the success of virtual, or to use Castronova's highly inclusive term, synthetic worlds, from the early bandwidth poor text-based MUDs, like MIST, to today's graphically schematic online worlds and MMORPGs, like Second Life and World of Warcraft.

It examines these lessons in the light of recent developments in cognitive and neuro- sciences - exampled by authors like Lakoff, Noe, Ramachandran - that suggest how sensori-motor operations of the mind adopt a similarly parsimonious lo-res, lo-fi on-demand approach to managing information recall and mental image construction in support of action in the lived world.

Based on the empirical evidence of the games, and on the theoretical framework of the cognitive science studies, the paper argues for the construction of collaborative environments based on techniques which actively 'down-res', or schematize, transactions in shared worlds, and that pursue collaborative environments that are rich, rather than high, in bandwidth.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
interactivity and performance
digital media in time and space
policies and strategies for digital deployment
digitisation techniques and problems
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

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[Proposal (PDF)]  

Web2.0, distributed creativity and tools for framing group thought

Brett Phares

(Submission #91)


Summary

What's so special about Web2.0 and tools for shared knowledge? Can it truly offer students new ways to express and shape what they see and experience? In this paper, elements that make up Web2.0 tools will be discussed, along with a case study on the use of one such tool, Mindmeister. In conjunction with other web-based tools, Mindmeister offers students real-time collaboration in organizing, filtering and building on their ideas through graphical topology or thought maps, in a genuinely interactive learning environment (see syllabus with embedded thought map: http://mpotential.org/COM317-SP08/ ).

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
policies and strategies for digital deployment
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
encouraging the connections and tensions that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  

The British Library Archival Sound Recordings Project: Digital Archives for the Google Generation

Ginevra House

(Submission #92)


Summary

The Archival Sound Recordings project makes selections of music, spoken word and environmental sounds from British Library Sound Archive available online to higher and further education.

The project is one of an increasing number of digitisation projects being undertaken by libraries, universities and museums around the country, bringing millions of items of previously inaccessible archive materials online.

There is an ongoing need to explore the use of these new resources in teaching, learning and research. With students and academics increasingly turning to internet search engines as their first port-of-call, online archives are often overlooked as a source of high quality, primary source material. So an important aspect of the Archival Sound Recordings project is engaging with academics and researchers about the use of audio across all subject disciplines.

This paper explores the Archival Sound Recordings project from start to finish, from selecting recordings for digitisation through to their use in the classroom. It will examine the processes and challenges involved in creating the service, explore the pedagogical use of audio, and look at ways to exploit Web 2.0 technologies to create a collaborative environment where users can enhance online archives.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

integration/deployment of digital resources in new contexts
exploring the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.
policies and strategies for digital deployment
digitisation techniques and problems
using digital resources in creative work, teaching and learning, and scholarship
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners
cataloguing and metadata aspects of resource discovery
achieving scale and sustainability in the digital arena
intellectual property rights

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[Proposal (DOC)]  

The Weave – an Interauthorship Process

Ghislaine Boddington

(Submission #93)


Summary

This paper will outline and discuss the interauthorship process and multi-distribution model used by body>data>space in the creation of digital performance works.

Now open source and social networking models have come of age in our virtual realms the debate about physical/people based democratic working models is at the forefront.

How can we gain acceptance of the collective practice of most 21st century projects? How do we enable and acknowledge the participation by many in a world still dominated by ego-centric celebrity culture and by curators, funders and critics obsessed with the author?

This presentation will put forward this interauthorship methodology, explaining the basis of the process and the way the outcomes occur. It is the creation of a collective pool of knowledge, through both virtual and physical connectivity, that can evolve a truly shared making process. Belief that knowledge transfer and collaborative practise enables the best to come out in all of us is at the base of the methodology.

The presentation will reference digital interactive performance practice.

Categories

Proposal Type:  Academic Paper

Keywords

creating a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
interactivity and performance
redefining disciplinary boundaries.
delineating new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
training methods and best practices for digital arts and humanities practitioners

Download

[Proposal (PDF)]  


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